Collection: Unit 3: Core Languages

Creative Coding

First Task

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After the first failed attempts in class, where we played with very basic shapes, I couldn't help noticing the similarity with the TfL patterns on the Tube, in the seats, on the walls... I tried to experiment a little bit with the shape of the logo of TfL, but didn't manage to get what I wanted.

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Richter at FLV

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Richter at Tate Modern

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Own Instructions

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I've chosen Gerard Richter for my task. I saw his abstract paintings in Tate Modern a while ago, but didn't really pay attention to him until I saw the panoramic pieces. After some research I've seen that he has explored geometrically basic shapes and colours in various of his pieces, many of them found in Fondation Louis Vuitton.

Even though he uses basic elements, it's through colour, repetition, size and placement that he achieves such mesmerising results. Therefore, I'm taking all of these elements into account when playing with the shapes in the computer.

Ironically, it does remind me of some TfL patterns and shapes.

In the first lesson we learned about the way coding works through a more physical approach, which really helped me understand that, basically, computers work under a set of instructions, a.k.a. a code, which has to be set up. 

My group came up with a binary system in which you could only represent numbers/quantities by hitting your right hand (1) and your left hand (2) on the table, and the numbers added up. The result was a series of funny noises from the group that tested our code.

It's interesting to consider this noise as the media through which the information is conveyed, just as the coloured lines from the first exercise are a representation of a never-ending code followed by us.

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Panorama

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